A GIS TUTORIAL

Navigating the Path of GIS Projects

GIS Project Management: Balancing Precision, Detail, and Real-world Application

Samuele
3 min readAug 20, 2023

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I bought a book to deepen my (limited) knowledge of ArcGIS Pro. It’s the manual “Mastering ArcGIS Pro” by Maribeth H. Price, published by McGraw Hill. I intend to share my notes as I come across interesting or useful chapters, or ones that I haven’t understood well. I’m starting with the section titled “GIS Project Management” from the introduction.

GIS project management

A GIS project can range from a small endeavor taking a few days by an individual to an ongoing initiative involving a large organization with numerous participants. Regardless of size, projects typically adhere to the generalized model illustrated in the diagram, and most new users acquaint themselves with GIS through a project-based approach. Such projects typically commence with a needs assessment. What specific issues require investigation? What type of information is essential to facilitate decision-making? What functions must the GIS fulfill? How long will the project endure? Who will utilize the data? What funding is accessible for initial setup and ongoing maintenance?

Image from “Mastering ArcGIS Pro” by Maribeth H. Price, published by McGraw Hill

Having a clear understanding of the system’s intended accomplishments is crucial for efficient design. Users might discover that vital data are missing, or resources have been squandered in acquiring data that remains unused. In short-term projects, needs are usually straightforward. However, in long-term organizational systems, needs evolve over time, necessitating periodic reevaluation. A well-designed system is adaptable to future modifications, whereas a hastily constructed system may demand constant rework when changes emerge.

In endeavors aiming to find specific answers to scientific or managerial inquiries, a methodology or model must be selected. Models transform the raw project data into valuable information through a well-defined series of steps and assumptions. For instance, creating a map of landslide hazards serves as a simple example. A model could be formulated such that if an area possesses a steep slope and consists of shale rock, it should be classified as hazardous. Geological and slope data layers can then be…

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Samuele

I'm a hobby programmer, experimenting with Svelte, Javascript, Construct 3 and magic tools